Justice League’s Wonder Woman: The Diana for a Generation (DCcomics.com)

Justice League's Wonder Woman: The Diana for a Generation

With this weekend’s release of the long-awaited (and very well reviewed) Wonder Woman feature film, Princess Diana is forefront in pop-culture and entertainment news. With all that attention on the Amazonian warrior, DC Comics has featured several of their staff writers’ reflections on what Wonder Woman means to them. Ashley V. Robinson described how the Wonder Woman of Justice League and Justice League Unlimited introduced her to, and defined the character of, DC’s most famous female hero.

In “Justice League’s Wonder Woman: The Diana for a Generation”, Ashley writes:

…when Justice League debuted I was given my first real and meaningful incarnation of Princess Diana of Themyscira a.k.a. Wonder Woman. Little did I know in my pre-teen brain that this version was about to imprint so hard as to become my definitive Wonder Woman.

(Justice League’s) Diana Prince (is) an exceptional role model for children. Wonder Woman’s intelligence, strength and self-assurance are all qualities that young girls and boys should be instilled with, but when you add Diana Prince’s professional success as an international ambassador, the character becomes proof that all things can be achieved if they are approached with balance and measure. This is something that I’m still striving for in my day-to-day life because Wonder Woman was probably the first fictional example I had of a career woman who was so much more than her job, yet unrestrained by her femininity.

She also had some very nice things to say about Susan’s portrayal of the character:

No small part of this incredible version of Wonder Woman is due to Susan Eisenberg. Her performance brought both beauty and grace to the character, coupling with fierce emotions. She effortlessly gives these complicated aspects of Princess Diana of Themyscira life, rather than resting on any laurels and giving a — pardon the pun — cartoonish one-dimensional performance. Eisenberg was so good at her job that she is still providing the voice for Wonder Woman in the Injustice video games that are being produced. She holds the record for having played Wonder Woman the longest and will, likely, hold that title for a good long time. This is because Susan Eisenberg is Wonder Woman for me and so many other people all over the world. To us, she is, in many ways, the definitive Wonder Woman and people who were fortunate, like myself, to have grown up with her as our Diana Prince are a very lucky generation of geeks indeed.

You can read the entire article on the DC Comics website here.